What's in it?


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Posted by Catherine Cartwright Jones on August 23, 2002 at 00:04:48:

I just started comparing twenty henna powders under the microscope.
I'm reluctant to post the results, becuase there is some good news and
some bad news (for people who think nothing dodgy is in THEIR henna).
I'll have them all tested and the results organized by this time
tomorrow.

The good news is that Jamila is "squeeky clean": no dye, no grit,
flawless sifting, no plant debris, nothing in there that shouldn't be
there. Like you didn't know Jamila is FABULOUS. I'm so thrilled that
Theodora and Amy are getting their shipments!

You probably know if you've got henna with plant or mineral debris,
but perhaps you'd like to know HOW MUCH debris is in one brand
compared to others. You may NOT know who's henna has dye, and who is
just plain dumping dye into their henna.

If you want a copy of the results ... email me. I don't want to post
this outright, because I want to let people have a chance to correct
problems privately if there are problems. If you want me to test
something ... I just need a few grams for the microtest.

How am I testing? I take a little powder, put it on a white porcelain
plate. I drop in enough lemon juice to disperse it. I use a jewelers
loupe, and go over it several times, from 10x to 50x, and watch the
progression of the material over a few hours until it's all dry. I
rub the dispersed liquid/powder with the back of a spoon against the
porcelain to test for grit. I nibble it between my teeth to test for
grit. I count and average the bits of identifiable mineral grit,
henna plant debris, non henna plant debris, bugs and stuff in a 1/2"
field.

Testing for staining power is another thingie ..... this is the
"What's in it" test.

 


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